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    (IGN)BIOSHOCK 2 SPECIAL EDITION REVIEW

    xMxExTxAxLx
    By xMxExTxAxLx,
    I know you could kill someone with the box. It is so big and heavy.

    (IGN) ARMY OF TWO 40TH DAY REVIEW

    xMxExTxAxLx
    By xMxExTxAxLx,
    Army of Two: The 40th Day Review Shanghai's been slated for fun co-operative demolition. by Jeff Haynes January 8, 2010 - Army of Two: The 40th Day feels like Bad Boys meets 2012. It's essentially an interactive disaster movie because every five minutes something blows up or crumbles around you, which provides an adrenaline rush as you fight through enemies or just survive what's thrown at you. A huge improvement to the franchise, EA Montreal clearly paid attention to the first game's issues, because almost every aspect has been improved. There are still some misses, but for the most part The 40th Day is a much stronger title and lots of fun. Unlike the first game, which spanned several years and different regions of the world, The 40th Day all takes place in Shanghai over the course of a few days. Rios and Salem are back, running missions for their own private military corporation, TransWorld Operations. They take a contract that's way too easy: kill a few guards, handle a few objectives and score a large paycheck. But as they finish their mission, all hell breaks loose in Shanghai. Buildings blow up, aircraft fall from the skies -- total chaos reigns. Salem and Rios have to stay alive long enough to figure out who's behind this. Watch our video review here (HD available). Now, the basic gameplay mechanics haven't changed too much from the original. Instead, they've been augmented to feel fresher and deeper. One of the first game's most appealing elements was the option to "pimp" your gun, swapping gun barrels or stocks or even gold plating the weapon to make it more effective in battle. Unfortunately, the first game's options were shallow, but in The 40th Day they have been vastly expanded. There are loads of new paint schemes, more options to modify your weapons, and you can even change the melee attacks based on your gear. Equip a screwdriver or kitchen knife "bayonet" on your gun and you'll see just what I mean. While the customization is awesome, the secondary weapon feature is too restricted -- you're locked to one of three pistol options, which can feel too limited. Why can't you choose to equip two assault rifles and a sniper rifle if you wanted? This minor issue aside, the fact that you can customize any weapon at any time (except in the heat of battle) is a huge plus for gun fans. Supply crates add to the customization options. These are a new addition to the gameplay and they're scattered throughout each chapter. If you don't stop the enemy before they call for reinforcements, the crates lock permanently. However, move quickly and you can steal cash and weapons parts from the enemy, which provides an extra challenge. The Aggro system makes a comeback as well, but it's better. You still work together, one player firing to distract enemies while the partner creeps up and flanks them. But now, Rios and Salem have a GPS, which can tag enemies and help you find your way. Once an enemy is tagged you can see where they are, even if they duck for cover or hide behind walls. This expands your tactical options as you and your partner seek and destroy your enemies. I just wish the computerized AI partner tagged enemies more frequently; it can feel like you have to do all the work. Light up the glowing target, Rios. Light up the glowing target, Rios. In the first game single-player was fun but co-op and multi-player really stood out, mostly because playing with a human was so much better than the feeble AI. While playing with a human via split-screen or online is still the best way to play, your AI partner and the enemies clearly got a brain transplant, making The 40th Day much stronger as a result. Enemies use the same moves and tactics that you do. If you wound but don't kill an enemy solider, his buddies may sneak up and try to heal him. However, the AI still has its flaws. Enemy soldiers don't press attacks very well. If Rios needs Salem's help, the AI might just stand around and watch while Salem saves him from bleeding out. There also seems to be a "trigger" mechanism for some soldiers -- they can see you and you can see them, yet they still won't attack unless you shoot first. But these are occasional glitches. For the most part, the AI is much smarter and has a better sense of tactics, requiring more coordinated effort by you and your partner. The improved AI also helps the "Co-Op Moments," which feel much more organic in The 40th Day than the original. If you switch to your sniper rifle, your partner is smart enough to do the same and he will shoot when you do. If you pretend to surrender to an enemy, your partner will play along until you decide to open fire. You can even subdue the enemy and free any hostages they may be holding, allowing you to have an impact on the new morality system that judges how kind or ill-tempered your mercenaries really are. See, you have a choice during your escape: save yourself and blast everything that moves or restrain soldiers and save the locals. If you save civilians, you'll get cash or weapons parts. If you kill them, you might miss out. Eventually these decisions add up and affect what items you receive throughout the game. You'll also encounter "extreme morality moments," which are larger moral dilemmas that affect both partners. Nothing is clear cut in this world, so even choosing what seems like the lesser of two evils can have a dark resolution. Regardless of your decision, you'll get a cut scene that shows you the immediate repercussions and its long-term implications. Subdue or execute? The choice is yours. Subdue or execute? The choice is yours. I like the morality system, but it doesn't go far enough. The low-key moments can get a bit repetitive -- honestly, how many hostages can you save? Why not put Salem and Rios in a situation where they have to choose between saving an injured woman or a child, but they can't save both? However, there's a bigger problem: at the end of every chapter, your morality resets itself. So you can be a total jerk in Chapter 1 and a saint in Chapter 2 without your partner batting an eye (unless you're playing with another human being). The visuals are particularly strong in The 40th Day. Even though the game takes place in just one location, you really get a sense of how the varied environments of the city are altered because of the gameplay. Shanghai goes from beautiful to busted. There are awesome particle effects, like rubble and dust from falling buildings, electrical sparks from wiring and smoke from explosions. Even Rios and Salem have undergone a character makeover, with a noticeable size difference between each character. The subtle touches, like watching the characters flip up their face masks to talk to each other, are excellent, and both characters animate well, especially during melee attacks. There is texture pop-in on both PS3 and 360, and the camera can pick bad angles, especially during bromance moments, but overall, visual differences are minimal. The lone standout is that the 360's shadows are a bit smoother than the PS3. Sound design is great as well. The voice actors deliver their lines expertly and with perfect comedic timing. Salem's "Worst. Zoo. Ever," comment after you've fought your way through a fortified animal enclosure is simply hilarious. I do wish there was a little more banter. It's a tricky balance to strike -- they talked too much in game one and it feels like they're too subdued now. That's a disappointment because the dialogue is good. Just when you're about to say "That plane's going to crash," one of the characters says it for you. In spite of that, the sound is terrific. Your customized weapons make distinctly different sounds as you exchange parts, and you get the auditory sense of being in a war zone. Watching Shanghai reduced to debris is unbelievably awesome. Watching Shanghai reduced to debris is unbelievably awesome. Multiplayer is also vastly improved. The 40th Day comes with three modes for up to twelve players -- four if you pre-ordered the game. In Co-op Deathmatch you and your partner face off against other teams of two. Control is like Capture the Flag, except instead of picking up an object, you fight to capture and hold a point in the environment until you're awarded points. "Warzone" is an objective-based mode which constantly updates itself as you're playing. For example, the first objective might be to blow up a target while the enemy stops you, while the next one might spawn in a computer controlled enemy that either side can kill for points. Whenever one side succeeds, a new objective pops up. "Extraction" is the fourth mode, which will be exclusive to those who pre-ordered The 40th Day for a month. Unlike the other modes, this is limited to four players who are placed in an environment and have to survive against increasingly difficult waves of enemies -- tricky, but fun. No matter what mode you're in, you're always tied to a partner, which reinforces the co-op nature of the game. If you get shot, your partner is the only one that can help you. If he doesn't, you'll have to re-spawn. Closing Comments A disaster movie in a game package, Army of Two: The 40th Day capitalizes on its co-op play to deliver an awesome action experience that's incredibly fun to play. Co-op moments feel more natural, and whether you're playing by yourself or with friends, you'll enjoy the fast paced action that doesn't seem to slow down, even when you're in the middle of a cutscene. The improved Aggro system (thanks to the inclusion of the GPS feature) and expanded weapons customization strengthens the tactics on the battlefield, which are much deeper than the previous title. Even multiplayer reinforces the co-op nature of the game, and its modes will keep you playing for a long time. The morality moments could have posed larger dilemmas and the AI still stumbles at times, but overall, The 40th Day is a great game to blast through.

    (IGN) GOD OF WAR 3 REVIEW

    xMxExTxAxLx
    By xMxExTxAxLx,
    God of War III Quick Hit Sony gives us a taste of Kratos, but we're thirsty for more. by Greg Miller January 18, 2010 - If the two minutes I just played of God of War III are any indication, this game is going to be a visual spectacle. There are sweeping camera angles, constant action, the orientation of levels changes on a whim, and some truly jaw dropping graphics. Wow. With the arrival of Kratos just a few months away, Sony isn't really showing too much of its hand, but the curtain was lifted just a bit on a battle on a Titan's back. Now, if you remember the "Fear Nothing" trailer from way back when, you'll remember Kratos battling all kinds of baddies on a rocky surface only to have the camera zoom out and to find the fight was on just a small portion of the Titan named Gaia's mammoth back as she scaled Mount Olympus. That's where this demo picks up. It all starts off simply enough; the demo opens with Kratos standing on a rocky clearing. The sky is dark and there's a whole bunch of ash (or at least particles) floating through the air. You take Kratos to the right of the screen and the camera swings to his back as you start tearing low level bad guys in half and stabbing their buddies. As you progress down this solitary pathway, you get a glimpse of a massive blue Titan scaling the mountain you're climbing to your left. The devil's on her shoulder. The devil's on her shoulder. But wait! You're not climbing a mountain; over on the left side of the screen you catch a glimpse of a massive face and realize that you're climbing the Gaia's arm while she climbs a mountain. I had little time to take in this realization because out of nowhere a massive creature pops up and wants to fight. Made of water, this beast packs the head of a horse and the limbs of a crab. Yeah, it's effed up. The creature slams its pointy tendril into Gaia's arm (your ground) and you can see her face contort in pain as well as hear her screams. With that, Gaia flings her arm back, which now leaves Kratos hanging from one blade he's embedded in the Titan's arm and slashing with the other blade in an attempt to slay the monster blocking his path. After a few hits the Titan starts to reach back up, so the fight changes perspectives again. Now, Kratos is basically climbing up a wall -- he's got a blade in the arm and has his feet planted against the structure. From this position, you slash some more, follow the onscreen commands, and rip the water creature's jaw off. End demo. Water horses scare me. Water horses scare me. As cool as the fierce action was -- again, everything you just read happened in like a two-minute span -- what knocked my socks off was the presentation. When Gaia initially flung her arm back, the camera zoomed way out so that you could take in the entire scene, and while this was happening, you could still be fighting as Kratos. When the action moved around, there was another pan out followed by a fast zoom that traveled up the creature's arm in this sweeping, twisting, turning way to the action. As the brawl continued, you could hear Gaia wailing in the background in pain. This demo was way too short for my tastes, but that's only because God of War III looks so darn good. Luckily, we don't have to wait much longer, but seeing stuff like this in motion makes it all the tougher to sit here Kratos-less.

    Most anticipated game of 2010

    JJ-KwiK
    By JJ-KwiK,
    Metroid The other M

    How to avoid R/S and M/U download limits by changing your IP address.

    JJ-KwiK
    By JJ-KwiK,
    Thanks for the info man!!!

Portal by DevFuse · Based on IP.Board Portal by IPS
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